Burger King ad triggers Google Home

Burger King ran TV adverts designed to trigger Google Home, getting the device to ask questions about BK’s Whopper.

Of course people turned the tables, getting Google’s device to read out all sorts of negative things about the product.

While the advert is clever, I don’t think it’s smart.  It (unintentionally) exposes a flaw in these digital assistants, but it’s also like picking up another man’s guitar, sitting on another man’s motorbike or riding another man’s real doll*.  

Also, BK running about twenty years too late, here.

Back in 19*cough* I was working for an online retailer and tried to persuade the bosses to embed audiofiles in the website that would autoplay whenever it was loaded.

What would it play?  Dog whistles.  Humans wouldn’t hear it, but dogs would get excited.  That’s viral marketing, folks.

In retrospect, might have been better received if I had been working for a pet food retailer at the time.

*I imagine.  Those mastic mannequins are really expensive.

http://www.adweek.com/creativity/google-disabled-burger-kings-ad-hijacking-google-home-but-bk-got-around-that-too/

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How to use the Gnasher in Gears of War.

Don’t aim down the sights.

If had a videogame spirit weapon – that is, a weapon that seems to suit better than any other, and perhaps more than in any other game – it would be the gnasher in Gears of War.

I think it was because of my kung fu training – the digital equivalent of sitting in horse stance with cups of boiling hot tea on my legs.

 

A lot of my time playing Gears on the 360 was with Americans, so I had to deal with lag.  Somehow though, I became lethal with it.  It wasn’t unknown for me to take out teams by myself, even as the last player on my side.

I’m not sure why or how it happened, but at some point I decided to stop aiming.  I’d walk around (I’d walk) and try to keep the end of the gun pointing at around chest/head level.

I picked up Gears of War 4 a couple of weeks ago, to join in with that same group of Americans.  Despite not really playing any of the titles in years (and the gnasher being borked), I soon warmed up.  Same story when I hopped into a public match.

Don’t aim down the sights.   You’re using a close-range weapon.  A cudgel.  By the time you’ve aimed down the site, the opponent has moved.  You then release aim, turn, then look down the barrel again.  Wasted time.

Walk around, use your stick to keep the gun pointed up a little and pull the trigger.  That’s how to use the gnasher in Gears of War.

 

 

Forza was the wrong game to showcase Scorpio.

Digital Foundry announced the Scorpio specs today. Microsoft’s nextBox.

I thought it was disappointing the featured game was Forza.

Racing games are not interesting examples of console power. Yes, you’ll get Forza at 4K, but how important is 4K in gameplay terms?

I’m playing Ghost Recon Wildlands at the moment.   There, a powerful 4K console would be great because it would a) allow me to see enemies farther away with greater clarity and b) be able to put those enemies farther away, because the console was simulating more of the world at greater distances.

I’m struggling to think of an equally meaningful change in racing games. Better weather physics? Maybe, but how different will that be to previous versions?

AI drivers – yes, but they can only interact with you in very limited ways. Again, how would that seem different?

Suspension? Same issue.

Racing games aren’t necessarily good platforms for stories and adventures or emergent gameplay.  But it’s precisely those engaging experiences that keep people coming back to games – see GTA V.

So far, the exciting thing about Scorpio is 60FPS.  But is that enough to warrant a new console?

Blind SFV player wins tournament match.

 

Really interesting video.   I actually thought the blind chap was playing Akuma at first, which is either a testament to his skill or my inability to read the game.  Probably the latter.

But what I like best about this, apart from the fact a blind chap is taking part in a tourney, is that it forces us to ask questions about his tactics and therefore about the game.

It looks like he’s working on audio cues and that makes me realise I don’t pay enough attention to them, or information we can glean from them and their absence.    I know that there’s a sound when someone uses an hadoken, but I don’t know if the audio lasts for as long as the fireball is on screen.

If I closed my eyes, I could tell when a fireball was thrown – but then do I only know how far away it was if I stand still and block?  Does that mean I need to block multiple times to understand my opponent’s preference for distance?

I might watch this a few times to see what he does that looks like its happening because he’s blind – for example jumping back and punching when perhaps Akuma isn’t in range.